extricate


extricate
extricate vb Extricate, disentangle, untangle, disencumber, disembarrass are comparable when meaning to free or release from what binds or holds back.
Extricate, the most widely useful of these words, implies a situation in which someone or something is so entangled (as in difficulties or perplexities) or so restrained (as from freedom of action or movement) that great force or ingenuity is required to bring about a release
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the fly was not able to extricate itself from the spider's web

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extricate himself from financial difficulties

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extricate his car from the mud into which its wheels had sunk

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my success in having extricated myself from an awkward predicament— Heiser

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Disentangle adheres far more closely than extricate to its basic sense of to free from what entangles; also, it is used typically of things rather than of persons and therefore seldom involves the ideas of difficulty or perplexity except for the person who seeks to free the thing entangled or to unravel what is intricately complicated
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disentangle a strand from a twisted skein

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[Seneca] is a dramatist . . . whom the whole of Europe in the Renaissance delighted to honor. It is obviously a task of some difficulty to disentangle him from his reputation— T. S. Eliot

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I could not then so far analyze all that is roughly lumped together as "religion" as to disentangle the essential from the accidental— Ellis

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Untangle is sometimes used in place of disentangle with much the same implications
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leaned down to untangle his foot from a vine in which it was caught

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drank, set down his glass, and untangled his legs— Basso

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Disencumber implies a freeing from what weighs down, clogs, or imposes a very heavy burden
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he can call a spade a spade, and knows how to disencumber ideas of their wordy frippery— George Eliot

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the trees, laden heavily with their new and humid leaves, were now suffering more damage than during the highest winds of winter, when the boughs are specially disencumbered to do battle with the storm— Hardy

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Disembarrass implies a release from what embarrasses by or as if by impeding, hampering, or hindering
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disembarrass himself of his companion— Scott

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disembarrass ourselves of the curse of ignorance and learn to work together— Alvin Johnson

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Chamberlain, at several critical junctures, preferred to disembarrass himself of trained, expert advisers— Namier

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Analogous words: disengage, *detach, abstract: liberate, release, *free: *rescue, deliver
Contrasted words: *hamper, fetter, trammel, shackle, clog, hog-tie, manacle: impede, obstruct, *hinder, block

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Extricate — Студийный альбом …   Википедия

  • Extricate — Ex tri*cate ([e^]ks tr[i^]*k[=a]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Extricated}([e^]ks tr[i^]*k[=a] t[e^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Extricating}([e^]ks tr[i^]*k[=a] t[i^]ng).] [L. extricatus, p. p. of extricare to extricate; ex out + tricae trifles, impediments,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • extricate — I verb clear, cut loose, deliver, deobstruct, detach, disburden, discharge, disembarrass, disembroil, disencumber, disengage, disentangle, disenthrall, disjoin, dislodge, disprison, enlarge, exonerate, expedire, exsolvere, free, let loose,… …   Law dictionary

  • extricate — (v.) 1610s, from L. extricatus, pp. of extricare disentangle, perhaps from ex out of + tricae (pl.) perplexities, hindrances, of unknown origin. Related: Extricated; extricating …   Etymology dictionary

  • extricate — [v] get out of a situation; relieve of responsibility bail out*, clear, deliver, detach, difference, differentiate, disburden, discumber, disembarrass, disencumber, disengage, disentangle, disinvolve, extract, free, get off the hook*, get out… …   New thesaurus

  • extricate — ► VERB ▪ free from a constraint or difficulty. DERIVATIVES extrication noun. ORIGIN Latin extricare unravel , from tricae perplexities …   English terms dictionary

  • extricate — [eks′tri kāt΄] vt. extricated, extricating [< L extricatus, pp. of extricare, to disentangle < ex , out + tricae, vexations: see TRICK] to set free; release or disentangle (from a net, difficulty, etc.) extricability n. extricable… …   English World dictionary

  • Extricate — Infobox Album | Name = Extricate Type = Album Artist = The Fall Released = February 1990 Recorded = 1989 90 Genre = Rock Length = 54:32 (original CD) Label = Phonogram Producer = Coldcut, Craig Leon, Mark E. Smith, Adrian Maxwell Sherwood Reviews …   Wikipedia

  • extricate — [[t]e̱kstrɪkeɪt[/t]] extricates, extricating, extricated 1) VERB If you extricate yourself or another person from a difficult or serious situation, you free yourself or the other person from it. [V pron refl from n] It represents a last ditch… …   English dictionary

  • extricate — UK [ˈekstrɪkeɪt] / US [ˈekstrɪˌkeɪt] verb [transitive] Word forms extricate : present tense I/you/we/they extricate he/she/it extricates present participle extricating past tense extricated past participle extricated formal 1) to get someone out… …   English dictionary


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